Make the most of your Federal Relief Funds with Gator’s vast array of music education and enrichment products this school season. Items include instrument face masks, bell covers, choral masks, music stands, instrument cases, and utility carts to help keep your students safe. Learn how it can help address some of the impacts of COVID-19 at your school by exploring the link below.

Note: This article was originally published in the School Band & Orchestra (SBO) Magazine and can be found here:

Instruments, Supplies and Materials to Help Ensure Health and SafetyIndividual instruments for each student to eliminate sharing (3,5)Individual mouthpieces for each student​ ​(3,5)Rental programs so that each student will have their own instrument (3,5) 

PPE, Cleaning Supplies and SanitationAppropriate cleaning and sanitizing materials (7)Sonic instrument cleaning of all instrumentsMouthpiece cleaner 

Ensuring Health and Safety (3, 5)Additional instruments/mouthpieces so students are not required to shareItems referenced in the recommendations from the NFHS research studies (13, 14, 15) http://bit.ly/NFHSResearchInstrument masks and bell coversPet training pads to accommodate spit valvesChoral masksAppropriate instrument cleaning productsSupplies to sanitize and clean facilities (7)Hand sanitizerDisinfectant wipes and spray 

Facility ConsiderationsSupplies and materials to make instructional environment meet recommended standards (barrier tape, portable carts, tents/​canopies​ for outdoor instruction, folding chairs/folding tables (15) 

SignageEquipment required to accommodate social distancing (12) 

Instructional SupportHiring new staff to expand beginner programs to reach students who were unable to participate during the 20/21 school yearTools and resources for distance education/learning (9)Teacher training for online resources, software programs (9)Support for low-income students with resources to help them with online learning (4, 9)Instruments for every childInstrument supplies such as reeds, rosin, trumpet grease, etc.Online private or group lessonsGroup instruction outside normal school hours to address student needs. (11) 

Summer ProgramsPlanning and implementing activities related to learning loss. (12)Opportunities to bring students into well-rounded learning experiences and rekindle their enthusiasm about returning to school. (12)Addressing the needs of low-income students, students with disabilities, English language learners, migrant students, students experiencing homelessness, and children in foster care. (11, 12)Enrichment activities (examples: musical theatre, band, guitar, keyboard, mariachi, music technology, ukulele, melodica, drum circles, steel drum band) (11) 

PlanningDeveloping and implementing plans for the next school year. (1, 2, 5, 8)Professional development time to plan for return to schoolProfessional development time to plan and coordinate new course offerings


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A-3. How may an LEA use ESSER funds?An LEA may use ESSER funds for the broad range of activities listed in section 18003(d) of the CARES Act, section 313(d) of the CRRSA Act, and section 2001(e) of the ARP Act. Although the lists of allowable uses of funds are not identical, any of the ESSER funds (ESSER I, ESSER II, or ARP ESSER) may be used to support all of the allowable uses of funds listed in any of the ESSER programs. We have consolidated below the three ESSER programs’ lists of allowable uses of funds.The activities that are listed in section 18003(d) of the CARES Act, section 313(d) of the CRRSA Act, and section 2001(e) of the ARP Act that an LEA may support with ESSER funds are:

  1. Any activity authorized by the ESEA, including the Native Hawaiian Education Act and the Alaska Native Educational Equity, Support, and Assistance Act (20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq.).
  2. Any activity authorized by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.).
  3. Any activity authorized by the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) (29 U.S.C. 3271 et seq.).
  4. Any activity authorized by the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act of 2006 (Perkins V) (20 U.S.C. 2301 et seq.).
  5. Any activity authorized by subtitle B of title VII of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (McKinney-Vento) (42 U.S.C. 11431 et seq.).2
  6. Coordinating preparedness and response efforts of LEAs with State, local, Tribal, and territorial public health departments, and other relevant agencies, to improve coordinated responses among such entities to prevent, prepare for, and respond to COVID-19.

1 See FAQ A-13 for a description of eligible entities under the GEER program.2 This activity is not explicitly listed in the ARP Act but is still an allowable use of ARP ESSER funds.10

  1. Providing principals and other school leaders with the resources necessary to address the needs of their individual schools.3
  2. Activities to address the unique needs of low-income children or students, students with disabilities,4 English learners, racial and ethnic minorities, students experiencing homelessness, and children and youth in foster care, including how outreach and service delivery will meet the needs of each population.
  3. Developing and implementing procedures and systems to improve the preparedness and response efforts of LEAs.
  4. Training and professional development for staff of the LEA on sanitation and minimizing the spread of infectious diseases.
  5. Purchasing supplies to sanitize and clean the facilities of the LEA, including buildings operated by such LEA.
  6. Planning for, coordinating, and implementing activities during long-term closures, including providing meals to eligible students, providing technology for online learning to all students, providing guidance for carrying out requirements under the IDEA and ensuring other education services can continue to be provided consistent with all Federal, State, and local requirements.
  7. Purchasing educational technology (including hardware, software, and connectivity) for students who are served by the LEA that aids in regular and substantive educational interaction between students and their classroom instructors, including low-income students and students with disabilities, which may include assistive technology or adaptive equipment.
  8. Providing mental health services and supports, including through the implementation of evidence- based full-service community schools.5
  9. Planning and implementing activities related to summer learning and enrichment and supplemental after-school programs, including providing classroom instruction or online learning during the summer months and addressing the needs of low-income students, students with disabilities, English learners, migrant students, students experiencing homelessness, and children and youth in foster care.

3 This activity is not explicitly listed in the ARP Act but is still an allowable use of ARP ESSER funds.4 As used in this document, students with disabilities refers to children with disabilities as defined in section 602(3) of the IDEA; 34 CFR § 300.8) and students who meet the definition of disability in section 705(9)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; see also 34 CFR § 104.3(j)). Although the CARES, CRRSA, and ARP Acts use the term, “children with disabilities” with respect to the allowable activity of providing activities to address the unique needs of certain groups of students, ESSER funds may be used to support students with disabilities under both the IDEA and section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. In some instances, this document refers to children with disabilities where the CARES, CRRSA, or ARP Acts use that term to set forth a requirement. However, even in instances where the CARES, CRRSA, or ARP Acts require funds to be used for children with disabilities, an SEA or LEA may also use its ESSER funds to support students with disabilities under section 504.5 The reference to full-service community schools is only in the ARP Act, but ESSER I and ESSER II funds may also be used for that purpose. Please note that, as described later in this document, ESSER funds can be used to hire a broad range of professionals who deliver mental health services and supports, including but not limited to nurses, school counselors, psychologists, and social workers.11

  1. Addressing the academic impact of lost instructional time6 among an LEA’s students, including low-income students, students with disabilities, English learners, racial and ethnic minorities, students experiencing homelessness, and children and youth in foster care, including by—
  2. Administering and using high-quality assessments that are valid and reliable to accurately assess students’ academic progress and assist educators in meeting students’ academic needs, including through differentiating instruction.
  3. Implementing evidence-based activities to meet the comprehensive needs of students.
  4. Providing information and assistance to parents and families on how they can effectively
  5. support students, including in a distance learning environment.
  6. Tracking student attendance and improving student engagement in distance education.7
  7. School facility repairs and improvements to enable operation of schools to reduce risk of virus transmission and exposure to environmental health hazards, and to support student health needs.
  8. Inspection, testing, maintenance, repair, replacement, and upgrade projects to improve the indoor air quality in school facilities, including mechanical and non-mechanical heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, filtering, purification and other air cleaning, fans, control systems, and window and door repair and replacement.
  9. Developing strategies and implementing public health protocols including, to the greatest extent practicable, policies in line with guidance from the CDC for the reopening and operation of school facilities to effectively maintain the health and safety of students, educators, and other staff.8
  10. Other activities that are necessary to maintain the operation of and continuity of services in the LEA and continuing to employ existing staff of the LEA.9

In determining how to prioritize its funds, an LEA should consider how to use those funds to safely reopen schools for full-time instruction for all students, maintain safe in-person operations, advance educational equity, and build capacity. An LEA may provide services directly or enter into an agreement (e.g., a contract or interagency agreement consistent with procurement requirements or otherwise legally authorized) for allowable activities under ESSER. An LEA is not authorized to award subgrants with ESSER funds.

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